Sys.dm_os_performance_counters Demystified | Simple SQL Server

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Источник: Sys.dm_os_performance_counters Demystified | Simple SQL Server

 

The dmv sys.dm_os_performance_counters is awesome, if you can understand it. This is how I make it easy to read and use. Here are the values I watch and why I watch them. My list isn’t going to be perfect and you’re not going to agree with it 100%, and I’m ok with that. First, there is no perfect. Second, if we agree 100% then one of us is just mindlessly following the other which isn’t good.

  • Cache Hit Ratio – I ignore this value, but I still monitor it. I will, ideally, never be the only DBA on a team again, and everyone seems to think this value is cool.
  • Page Life Exp – My favorite! When you read a page from disk into memory how many seconds will it stay there? Just don’t use the outdated “300” rule or your disks will catch on fire!!!
  • Page Lookups/Sec – How many pages are read from memory.
  • Page Reads/Sec – How many pages are read from disk.
  • Page Writes/Sec – How many pages are written to disk.
  • Lazy Writes/sec – How many pages are written to disk outside of a checkpoint due to memory pressure.
  • Batch Requests/sec – How busy is the server?
  • Trans/sec – How busy is the server?
  • Total Server Memory – How much memory SQL Server is currently using. Typically ramps up to Target value and PLE is low as it ramps up since new pages are in memory dropping the average.
  • Target Server Memory – How much memory SQL Server is allowed to use. Should be the same as the max memory setting, but memory pressure can cause this to decrease.
  • Memory Grants Pending – How many processes aren’t able to get enough memory to run. Should be 0, always 0, if not then find out why.
  • Deadlocks – How many deadlocks are we getting. Most apps handle deadlocks gracefully, but they still lose time doing it. If this number starts going up, start looking into it.
  • SQL Compilations/sec – This is a hidden performance killer! Some queries can’t be cached so they’re compiled every time they’re run. I’ve seen this with a query being run once a second and a big server was running slower than my laptop. It’s normal for things to compile throughout the day, it’s not normal for this number to be 10x higher than before that last upgrade.
  • SQL Re-Compliations/sec – Same goes here. The counters aren’t that much different.

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